Bass fishing at P-Arrow Plantation

By By Mike Giles / outdoors writer
July 16, 2004
Hot muggy weather greeted us as we arrived at the P-Arrow Plantation near Livingston, Alabama. Shortly after sunup, Bob Rea and I launched our boat on the still, mirror-smooth surface of the Ray Scott Lake. This lake was patterned after a lake designed by the Bass Angler's Sportsmen Society's founder Ray Scott. It was chock full of structure, channels, brush piles, drop offs and rock piles. Throw in a dock, several aerators and numerous laydown trees along the dam and you have the makings of some fine summertime fishing.
Usually the hot weather slows down the bass and it was true on this day as well. With water surface temperatures in the low nineties, the surface activity was nil to start with. After going only a short distance however, I cast directly over one of the aerators and a nice lunker bass smashed my crankbait and sent it soaring skyward almost instantly. Had I known how big the fish was I would have tried to prevent it from jumping? Spotting another aerator located near a dock we made a beeline to it. A couple of casts later and we had a couple of bass in the boat.
As we fished the aerator, a nice bass began smashing bream near the dock. Moving quickly over in that direction I made a cast directly in front of the dock and let the Zoom Ole Monster worm sink slowly. Before I could move it a lunker engulfed it and headed for parts unknown. As soon as the bass felt the sting of my steel, he started a series of acrobatic jumps that wore him down. We admired the bass and quickly released it to fight another day.
Souped-up bass
After a couple of hours we made our way by yet another aerator and instantly had another hook up. The bass were set up in a perfect ambush point on the side of a hump where the water swept shad overhead. As Rea cast his worm over the hot spot, another souped up oxygenated bass smashed it and fought like a demon. Although it was only about three and a half pounds, it fought like a monster.
During our next dozen or so casts we got a bite on every cast. On occasion, both of us even had bass on at the same time. In this spot, almost every bass was over three pounds.
We finished our morning by fishing overhanging brush and laydown trees. We caught several more bass and even lost a couple of lunkers, one taking my jig with him. By 11:30 we were hot, thirsty and a bit hungry, but the fishing had been good.
Noontime break
At lunchtime we were greeted by owners Drayton and Zina Pruitt at the lodge and treated to a scrumptious lunch. During our meal I learned that the P-Arrow Plantation had been hosting quail hunts for approximately 20 years. The last few years they have added some great deer hunting and lately some fine bass fishing.
They have been offering trips for bass fishing the last year and a half. With over one hundred acres of ponds stocked with Northern and Florida strain bass, they have a little of it all. From a small pond to one over thirty acres, there's sure to be something you will like.
After lunch we decided to fish Gator Lake. We were told that Gator was chock full of bass and we weren't disappointed. With the hot temperatures we wanted some action to keep us interested and we weren't disappointed. While making our way across the dam and deeper water we caught a few chunky sized two to three pound bass. Once on the west side of the lake the wind picked up and the bass began to bite hard and fast.
The west side of the lake is bordered by a tall hill with trees that provided shade and relief for the bass from the hot afternoon sun. A few feet off the steep banks was a ledge that quickly fell off into deeper water. For the next hour we caught bass after bass while matching each other cast for cast.
Better bite
As the wind got stronger, the bass bit even better. At one point I caught a bass and the boat drifted up next to the bank. Rea cast his worm into a cedar top right next to the boat and almost lost it. As he struggled to retrieve the worm out of the branches, a big hungry bass engulfed the bait and exploded out of the water with fury, sending water all over the front of the boat. After a ferocious battle another lunker had fallen victim to Rea's fishing prowess.
It didn't take long to figure out that the bass were relating to any wood structure in the lake. If there was a stump or piece of wood in the water, it usually held a bass. Several large cedar trees were home to multiple bass. If you could entice a bite, then you had to lay the steel to them and get them out of there fast, or they would hang you up in a heartbeat.
I haven't had too many days that I just got tired of catching bass, but I did on this afternoon. Bob Rea had told me what a fine place this was and I wasn't disappointed. Even though the weather was scorching, we still caught too many bass to count. During the cooler months 10-12 pound bass are not uncommon and some up to 15 pounds have even been caught.
Located only about an hour's drive from Meridian, P-Arrow offers area anglers a bass fishing opportunity that is rarely found in this part of the country. For more information on fishing at P-Arrow contact Drayton or Zina Pruitt at (800) 949-7990 or visit online at www.parrow.net. You'll be glad you did I guarantee.

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