Ad Spot

Kornegay's personal journey intersected with King's quest

By Staff
REMEMBERING KING Like many Americans, retired Meridian dentist Dr. Hobert Kornegay was moved by the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s quest for civil rights. Kornegay and King met while attending Morehouse College in Atlanta, when Kornegay was an upperclassman poised to "harass" a freshman King. Photo by Paula Merritt / The Meridian Star
By Ida Brown/special sections editor
Jan. 20, 2002
At the start of his senior year at Atlanta's Morehouse College in the mid-1940s, Dr. Hobert Kornegay was prepared to engage in the traditional "harassment" of college freshmen.
But there was one fellow among the group Kornegay thought should not receive too harsh treatment. Not only was the freshman younger than most of his peers 15 but he also already had quite a number of achievements in his young life.
Little did Kornegay know then that one day that freshman would become one of the most honored black men in America, leading millions in a non-violent struggle for civil rights.
King would surprise Kornegay again nearly two decades later, when he came to Philadelphia to investigate the burning of churches in the area.
The two college classmates were only able to visit briefly, but during their conversation King made an observation about Kornegay's wife, Ernestine.
Classmate or not, Kornegay was a strong King supporter.
As Americans prepare to commemorate King for achievements during his short life, Kornegay said he believes the slain civil rights leader would be disappointed today.
King also would be disenchanted by today's black youth, Kornegay said.
In recent years, King's family has been accused of "selling out the dream," particularly when an advertising campaign played computer-generated tricks with the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. Critics also have objected to the family's selling King's image and words, as well artifacts.
Kornegay said King's speeches and image have long been marketed by others. Most times without the family's permission.
Kornegay, who is recuperating from a stroke suffered last year, is currently working on his autobiography that will also touch on his experiences with King and other civil rights leaders.

Franklin County

Fall brings Pumpkin Palooza, NW-SCC trunk-or-treat event

Franklin County

Hodges festival promises food, fun, fireworks

Franklin County

Distinguished Through the Decades: 2008, Paige Palmer Thorne

Franklin County

Commission passes budget, shows support for two state amendments

Galleries

PHOTOS: Russellville Homecoming Court

Franklin County

PHOTOS: Tharptown Homecoming Court

Franklin County

NW-SCC public relations wins seven statewide awards

Franklin County

Phil Campbell City Council fills vacant seat

Features

Taste of Franklin: Flavors of fall

News

Red Bay celebrates Founders Day with plenty of entertainment for all

Franklin County

FCS bus driver faces arrest, termination

Franklin County

County seeks responses to broadband survey

Franklin County

NW-SCC reports highest fall enrollment since 2010 

Features

View from Crescent Moon Acres: How one New Jersey woman found her dream life in Phil Campbell

Franklin County

Franklin County 4-H rabbit project participants bring home awards

News

ADEM approves $348M for water, sewer projects

Franklin County

Extension warns: Harvest time means taking extra safety precautions

News

City approves line-of-credit bid from VSB for equipment purchases

News

Russellville Electric Board elects officers

News

RHS Marching Hundred hosts Northwest Alabama Classic

News

RCS BOE approves budget for FY-2023

Franklin County

FCS BOE passes budget

News

Red Bay plans annual Founders Day festival Sept. 24

Features

Distinguished Through the Decades: 2007, Lydia Hammock Freeman

x